Monday, March 06, 2006

78th Academy Awards: Best and Worst Dressed List

I know. The last thing you need is another best dressed list. From E! to CNN Headline News you will be flooded with the same photos of the same women on the same lists. But how does one really determine a starlet’s style score that will either boost her to fashion fame or condemn her to the depths of “don’t” hell? The answer is, you can’t. Style has always been subjective and in the eye of the beholder, or stylist. Fashion is always changing so something that looked so right will look so wrong a season later. (Uggs anyone?) Nevertheless, I will give you my list of the best and the worst of them because everyone is entitled to an opinion, right?

TOP 3 BEST:

1. Salma Hayek in Atelier Versace knows what works for her. The ocean blue hue was perfect for her olive skin and the fit accentuated all the right body parts. She looked gorgeous, just how a Latin bombshell should look.


2. Michelle Williams in Vera Wang. She took a chance with the color but succeeded. The saffron hue of the dress and wine-colored lips was unexpected but chic. And her retro waves completed the epic and unique look. Michelle, you’ve come a long way from Dawson’s Creek.


3. Felicity Huffman in Zac Posen. Why is it that after an actress plays an unflattering role (ie: Hilary Swank in Boys Don’t Cry and Charlize Theron in Monster), they feel the need to overdress and overprimp at the Oscar’s in order to prove they actually are attractive women? You were acting, we get it. Thank god Felicity knows better. With simple hair and makeup that grounded the stunning dress, she looked like a knockout without trying too hard.

TOP 3 WORST:


1. Naomi Watts in Givenchy. The bottom was harmless but the top looked was a shredded mess as if King Kong got a little frisky and took a bite out of her top. The color was wrong for her complexion, making her look washed out and ill. Maybe she was channeling Tim Burton’s “Corpse Bride”?


2. Sandra Bullock in Angel Sanchez. I’m all for choosing unknown designers but what was Mr. Sanchez thinking? Pockets? Was she cold? Did she need a place to stock her mints and lipstick? On top of that the dress was ill-fitting and made her look like a linebacker next to Keanu. Sorry Sandra, loved you in “Speed” but it’s time to find a new look.


3. Charlize Theron in Dior Haute Couture. Ironically during E!’s Live from the Red Carpet, Ryan Seacrest gushed the actress could wear a garbage bag and still be gorgeous. Well turns out she did, and well, she didn’t (respectively). Unfortunately Miss Theron who once was immune to fashion “don’t” lists lost her couture kryptonite by becoming the definition of a fashion victim last night. Choosing a way too “fashiony” piece that had no place being on a red carpet, the dress engulfed her statuesque frame and made her look like a 6 foot walking present. To make matters worse, her teased updo and raccoon eyes were overdramatic for the already theatrical dress. You really have to wonder, “What was she thinking?”

Final Word: Fashion and risk taking has no place on the red carpet. Thanks to the myriad of paparazzi and viewers at home, these women will be immortalized in Hollywood history so classic is the best way to go. This is not the place to set trends. In a world of Kitson-shopping, Sidekick clutching, Starbucks guzzling photo ops – here lays a chance to actually look like a movie star. So why is this still such a hard concept for some actresses to grasp?

1 comment:

Jamie said...

I thought Selma's dress was weird the way that strap sort of cut her left boob in half. The color was great for her, but i kept staring at her boobs. Or maybe that's just my weird fascination with big breasts since mine are so small.

I think Michelle Williams lost too much weight. Oh wait a minute, no one can EVER lose too much weight in Hollywood. What was I thinking? Anyway, I wasn't feeling that mustard color.

I think the best dressed was that asian chick from Memoirs of a Giesha...I don't know who the designer was, but she was absolutely stunning.